SITE UPDATED: 11/17/20
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Yale 62

New 11/03/20 This Just In

Nov. 3, 2020. David Honneus shares happy news: “Hello Classmates – News!! As you all know, my wife died in September of 2011. I’ve been ‘seeing’ Susan Metcalfe Larock, Skidmore ’62, and we are getting married!! Sue and I went to high school together! She’s a wonderful artist, lives in Plainfield, MA, in the Berkshire hill towns, and is more than wonderful!”


Oct. 12, 2020. Bob Rosenkranz is delighted to alert his classmates that Louise Glück,* the Rosenkranz Writer-in-Residence at Yale, has been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature.

(* Roman Weil reminds us that Professor Glück’s surname rhymes with ‘click.’)


Sept. 25, 2020. According to Yale Today, Yale has designated three independent laboratories to perform the university-developed SalivaDirect™ COVID-19 test. Along with Yale Pathology Labs — the first to offer the test — Access Medical Laboratories, Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), and Mirimus, Inc., represent the initial wave of providers for the innovative testing method. They will make SalivaDirect™ available to people in Florida, Minnesota and New York by late September. For the rest of the story, visit the Yale Today site here.


Sept. 25, 2020. Classmate Chris Bent writes that he has just self-published his 14th book, entitled “1-800-Give-Me-Liberty,” which joins 13 earlier books in his “1-800” series. This series shares reflections on how to create a life that responds to the increasing level of challenges presented by the main theme of each book. All are available from the well-known Internet book providers.


Sept. 21, 2020.
Renee Ater
Jonathan and Deanne Ater send in the following: “Renee Ater [their daughter] was on the PBS News Hour last night [9/17/20], talking about the new Eisenhower Memorial on the Mall in Washington DC. The others interviewed were the architect, Frank Geary, and David Eisenhower, Ike’s grandson. Heady company. As our friend Bob Knoll remarked: ‘She is a bright bulb.’ We are very proud of her. The link is below.”

Gehry-designed Eisenhower Memorial unveiled after 20 years — during a fraught moment
[Editor’s note: Depending on whether you have a PBS login – i.e., are a member – you may or may not be able to access the footage.]


Sept. 21, 2020. Phil Proctor sends along a bit of poetic “phun” from pal Jim Meskimen. We will post it on the 80th Birthday page, too.

Stop the presses, call the doctor
It’s time to celebrate Phil Proctor!
Humorist, sage, raconteur,
Wise, yet somehow immature,
Actor with an elfin grin,
Player of the violin,
Survivor of a gruesome massacre,
Character in films by Lassiter,
Always ready to opine
As member of The Firesign,
Visual artist, polyglot,
Beloved by all the friends he’s got,
Light as air, yet somehow weighty,
Can it be he’s turning eighty?


August 31, 2020. Eli Newberger is interviewed as a “pioneer in the pediatrics child abuse field” in this current article published in The Atlantic.


August 31, 2020. Bill Stork writes: “Being here in Hong Kong, and following the presidential dickerings from afar, I was entranced by this topic at once, as a secondary level educator who once taught a semester AP-level course based on the presidential synthesis of how the US has evolved due to various forms of executive leadership.*

“This offering by our classmate Bob Rosenkranz’s Intelligence Squared US so well fits into that of my approach to a full study of ‘US presidential history.’

“Very worth offering some special mention to, especially at these times, methinks.

“* My course outlines for a short study of US History, based on the ‘presidential synthesis’ are available on request. Should one be eager, please start with the paperback by Marcus Cunliffe, a British historian, whose Washington: Man and Monument serves well to document how the First Father set in place a role for future presidents to follow.

“There are follow-up supportive documents, online, by Yale professor Edmund S Morgan that are fun to read as they too are so illustrative of the effort that GW had then wanted to set a proper personal role, for the future presidents to identify with or adopt, so as to be above any of the political fray of later political ‘factions’. (I guess today we would call them ‘tribes’!)”


August 21, 2020. We sincerely apologize for the tardiness in listing this, but Louis Mackall’s daughter Melina is offering fitness classes online. For more information, including how you can sign up, please contact Louis at mackall@mac.com.


August 21, 2020.

Yale “will soon welcome more than 1,900 undergraduates to live and study on campus, a step that follows months of intensive preparations for a fall semester in which fastidious attention to health and safety will serve communal teaching, learning, research, and life.” Here’s the news link. We wish them excellent health and every success!


July 31, 2020. Bill Stott let us know that his “son Gordon ’s Mar Vista Connect 11 House has been selected as one of the five finalists for best prefab structure on the planet. Terrific news, you say — and it is. BUT he tells me there’s a vote for the Number One award, which vote has an internet-fed people’s-choice popularity component. Yes, ugh.”

Bill suggests that if anyone cares to do so, a vote for Gordon’s design might enable “a lovely little house [to] beat a skyscraper. I thank you, and I know Gordon would thank you, for any participation — even if all you offer are positive thoughts. Those go a long way these days. Here is a photo of me looking truly uncomfortable when the house was nearing completion.”

For anyone who wishes to vote, this is the link:
vote.architizer.com

(Gordon’s is the Mar Vista Connect 11 House. The site will ask you to sign up to vote, which is a hassle, but Gordon assures his Dad it’s a solid architecture website; if it puts you on a list, it’s an aesthetically interesting one.)


Follow this link for earlier This Just In entries …


 

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23 comments to This Just In

  • larry Prince

    Like this page. Thanks for doing this for the rest of us.

  • James M. Kelly

    A nifty page. I just listened to the Chambers-McGlashan interview and was fascinated by Bill’s take on the whole affair, most particularly his son’s. It is hard to imagine what it must be like to be involved in this affair, but his ability to frame it as an opportunity to grow and learn is inspiring.

  • David Scharff

    Thanks guys for reviving our website. It’s good to be in touch again.All sympathies to Bill and his family!
    BTW: Dickson Carroll’s sculpture exhibit is a blockbuster. Of course, I’m biased in that Jill and I bought another of his sculptures. His whimsical, creative and colorful creation is a wonderful product of our class.
    David Scharff

  • Fred Sellers

    Nice web page. Thanks very much.

    On the other hand, it seemed a bit snarky to insert the word “controversially” into the Art Laffer blurb. In fact any statement made by any economist at any time is controversial, because economics is an inexact science. What was particularly controversial about Laffer was that he ventured outside disciplinary groupthink.

  • Chris Cory

    You new editors have pushed the website to new heights of interest and accessibility and even delight (after listening carefully for the first time to the familiar “Give Yourself to Love”). Above all, it’s welcoming, and will be a pleasure to keep up with.

  • Jan Greer

    This is worth a read by any Class of ’62 member who feels, as I do, that Yale has lost her way, following questionable paths of historical revisionism, social experimentation, affirmative action, and unjustifiable extremes of “political correctness.” That she, guided by the dubious theories and beliefs of her administration, has become a populist weathervane, rather than a moral compass true to the timeless values of “unfettered inquiry, intellectual diversity, and academic excellence” that made her the once great institution of higher education she used to be.

    • Neiel Baronberg

      Jan,

      I just read your post on the Yale ’62 website. Your eloquent summary was spot-on. I decry the direction that campus PC and intersectionality has taken. We have beccme a nation of those feeling oppressed in some form, who find scapegoats around every corner and who fail to take responsibility for their own misery or inadequacy trying to join the high road of self-proclaimed virtue. If anything, one would hope that Yale teaches critical independent thinking above all and acute awareness of both side of the picture rather than knee jerk political positions. Solovoy could be a leading spokesperson but alas………….

      Best wishes as we carry on.

      Neiel Baronberg
      Calhoun (yes Calhoun) ’62

    • Ken Merkey

      Jan,

      10-4 on your comments. Glad to see that you have kept the flame alive. I attended the Assembly in November and have come away confused and unimpressed. It seems like the pursuit of academic excellence has taken a back seat to diversity and inclusion.

    • Anthony Carbone

      Jan…I realize that I am late to come to the party, but I finally found time to drill down on our class website wherein I found your Incredibly similar views to my take on Yale in the Salovey reign. I have expressed my concerns both in writing and face to face with the administration including the president himself, but came away with the sense that they view me as a “cranky old man” out of touch with the world of today. My anxiety level ratchets up further after reading each subsequent issue of Yale Today which now appears to be a relay station for excerpts from the New York Times and other very left leaning media organizations that are driving diversity, inclusion and other social justice themes, rather than a more balanced presentation of alternative views on the subject. If you ever need another voice to add to your chorus, let me know. My below the radar approach to Yale is obviously a waste of time, so I’m ready to join a more public outreach effort in this regard.
      Tony Carbone

  • Larry Prince

    I just heard that our classmate Rob Rosenkranz’ son is running for Trustee of the Yale Corporation. He is not put forward by the Nominating Committee but is trying to get on the ballot through a write-in candidacy. His name is Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, and he is dissatisfied with many things going on at Yale. He has to amass over 4,000 write-in votes by October 1.

    You can get more information about him and the process by going to
    Alumniforexcellence.com
    If interested, you should act quickly as October 1 is the last day to vote.

  • Willis (Bill) Boyer

    Nick Rosenkranz’s campaign needs our help, He is a wonderfully sensible fellow and has strong arguments that most of us can agree with. Please go to his site and sign on quickly!

    I had the pleasure of joining Artie Laffer at his recent recognition by the President and at a small dinner afterward. He is as full of energy, humor and wisdom as ever. However, I will note that we both had to be guided to our rooms at the Hay Adams Hotel later that evening, but happily!

  • Don Kirkland

    It was a wrong time and the wrong place for a protest, Sam.

  • Norm Jackson

    Good stuff! Thanks, guys, I really appreciate all you’re doing with the website! Best, Norm Jackson

  • Neal Freeman

    Happy to see Sam Waterston looking ageless, stalwart, even Lincolnesque, as he protested (I think this is right) Yale’s portfolio of Puerto Rican bonds. But the interruption of The Game, the interruption of the players’ four-year quest to excel as a team in their final game together, was one of the more astonishingly selfish acts I’ve ever witnessed. I don’t remember the football team storming the stage at the Dramat. Or at the first intermission of the recent conference on climate change. And I would have. The protesters should not have been applauded for exercising their constitutional freedoms. They should have been criticized for their appallingly bad manners and their utter disrespect for their fellow students. What the protesters managed to achieve was a news blackout of what actually happened on the field — the greatest performance by a Yale team in more than a century of competition with their arch rival. Congratulations to Kurt, J.P., and all of the boys in blue.

  • Willis (Bill) Boyer

    Don’t know which of the site editors wrote the snarky piece about Art Laffer above, but shame on you! Here it is, with my comments: “On Wednesday, June 19th, President Trump awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Art Laffer, most famous for his “Laffer curve,” a graph that controversially suggested that lowering tax rates might increase tax revenue. Very shortly thereafter, he began vocally supporting a wide variety of the president’s initiatives and ideas.
    **
    I was with Art in Washington when he got the award, enjoyed the reception for him at the Hay-Adams and dinner later with a small group of old friends from Cleveland’s University School who also attended. First of all, Art supported Trump during the Primary Election, believing that Trump had what it took to bring a Conservative agenda to Washington and defeat Mrs. Clinton. He was right, of course, and has been promoting Trump ever since. He did NOT just start praising Trump after he got the Presidential Medal. What a cheap shot you took! Shame.
    **
    Secondly, his “Laffer Curve” Supply Side economic theories may be controversial to you guys and to socialists, but they have been proven over and over in various US states and quite a few foreign countries. They have been misinterpreted and mistakenly used a few places, but states like Texas and Tennessee, for example, have enjoyed prosperity due partly to Art’s advice. Of course, maybe you think prosperity itself is suspect, and must be achieved by some “controversial” means.
    **
    I haven’t noticed any of you guys getting any Presidential Medals lately, so lay off the snide comments on those of us who have.

  • Bill Leckonby

    Can’t agree more with Merkey/Greer; what is going on back there in New Haven???? Thoroughly enjoy this site and all the input from fellow ’62’ers. Bill

  • Philip Proctor

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  • Steve, Dick, Chris:

    I wanted to learn about Steve Susman’s situation and now that I know, wish him the speediest recovery. Scrolling down from that update I found the many other comments. So it occurred to me to relay some of my recent activities. I’ve only just learned I’ve won some sort of independent press award for the small volume of verse I published a couple years back, “Humpty Trumpty Hit a Brick Wall.” It still sells modestly and may even have taken on a renewed meaning these days. More recently, I published “Great Dates With Some Late Greats,” related stories about famous deceased figures–Marilyn Monroe, Jesus, Elvis Presley, NIccolò Machiavelli, Mona Lisa, Adolf Hitler, Homer, others–who show up in the lives of men who need help of some sort. I’m also part of a WBAI weekly show these days called “The Hour of Lateral Thinking. In June, “Move It and Its Yours,” a musical I’ve written with Bill Weeden and Sally Fay will hour in a trimmed version, also on WBAI. Apologies for running my credits at such length.

  • Ken Merkey

    I understand that the Yale Daily News is in full support of shutting down interstate highways as a means of “peaceful” protest. Does that support help assuage their guilt?
    Does anyone remember Rev. William Sloan Coffin riding the freedom buses 50 years ago? Has anything changed?
    Last time I looked, the YDN was a news organization. Maybe they should stick to reporting the news, not trying to make it.
    They sure look like poor little lambs who have lost their way.

  • John S. Marr

    I guess I’m not in the ‘62 class. Over the previous year I submitted updates but none seemed to have made the cut. The most recent was to Steve Buck. Maybe I went to Harvard, but that was in 1972

  • Bill McGlashan

    Keep up the good work — you’ve done a great job with the “62 website! Really enjoy reading it, especially when so many truly challenging issues are confronting the planet and USA in particularly.

    AND, I’m overjoyed that TOMORROW will be Election Day — be great to have it over with! Even if Biden wins we’ll be in for some especially tough months until Jan. 20, 2021, and for many years thereafter as USA tries to recover from our four-year nightmare (and the decades prior during which we drifted into the society that resulted in the election of 2016).
    Bill

    • Steve Buck

      Dear Bill – Thanks for your encouraging comments about the website.

      I totally agree that it will be great to have the election over with – hopefully by the end of this week.

      Speaking of end of this week, I hope you can again join us for the coffee hour, tomorrow, November 5 at 1 p.m. Jean will be sending out the link to the coffee hour.

      Best,

      Steve Buck for the communications team

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